In step

A happy little poodle in step with his owner. Love the boots!
RIVIERA DOGS

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Sassy Pants

Yesterday I set out to try and get pictures of Lacey being sassy.  It isn’t as easy as it sounds.  I have to be 100% engaged with her or it instantly stops – which means I’m shooting with the camera held down near my knees while I’m flailing a big blue ball around with the other hand. I’m also having to keep Coulee entertained at the same time or she turns into a barking, jealous fiend.

But I occasionally fluked out. I wasn’t quite able to capture her cute little run though.. so I’ll have to try again.

Crazy Coulee and Little Lacey

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Fido + Fluffy’s Freebie Friday Exhibits at #BlogPaws

Although unfortunately we weren’t able to attend this year, some of our PawZaar jewelry has made it to BlogPaws, the annual pet blogging conference held this week in Myrtle Beach, South…



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DogTipper

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Britney Spears Plastic Surgery Revealed

Britney Spears Britney Jean Spears was born on 2 December, 1981 in McComb, Mississippi. She started with television shows and stage performances before heading towards live records. Her first album Baby One More Time become best selling album. She released her third album on her self titled Britney in 2001 and appear in the film […]



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Sunflower Faith

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Promenade des Anglais, Nice

Promenade des Anglais, Nice
RIVIERA DOGS

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Danish red fox takes out Eurasian eagle owl nestlings

The cute little red fox is quite a savage beast. It also shows us that the current fad for filming rare or relatively rare birds on nests with the use of web cameras can sometimes wind up with the ending we weren’t expecting:

 

 


Natural History

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Before and After – Part 1

I sat down and had a portfolio review done the other day by a local photographer.  It’s hard to find someone that can give you honest (and knowledgable reviews).  I’m hoping to get a more in-depth one done with a well known pet photographer soon but I couldn’t seem to find the time to wrap my head around all the information I needed to provide to make it worthwhile and it was easier to just gather 30 photos together and get some quick and dirty feedback.

It was good. I learned a lot – mainly about what I should be doing better in editing but a little bit about what I could be doing differently while shooting too. Going into this process, I didn’t feel like I needed to agree with every comment he said, but for the most part, I found I understood his point and agreed with him.

I thought I would re-edit the images based on the review and then post some before and afters. Mainly so I can remember and refer back to it, but also in case some of you want to learn from my mistakes.  :)

I tended to make the same “errors” over and over again.  The biggest one is putting my subject in the centre of the frame.  There are times when it’s the best option, but often it isn’t.  I know this.  I’ve heard this before, yet I can’t seem to stop myself.   I don’t tend to centre my subject in the middle of the entire picture – but often they are in the middle from side to side or from top to bottom.

In this situation I took quite a few pictures of her under the tree so I just chose one with a crop I could work better with to include the feedback – which was essentially to put her on the right edge and to include more of the tree on the left.

Another common criticism (although I didn’t specifically write it down for this one) was to darken the background elements and increase my contrast so I did that too.

Before:

After:

Crazy Coulee and Little Lacey

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Feb 19, Dog Digestion Differences to Chew On | Best Dog Food Guide

Chew on some important differences in human versus dog digestion systems. An understanding of these can help you making a difference from surviving to thriving of your canine companion.
Dog Food Blog | Best Dog Food Guide

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The Lupullela of Africa

lupullela adustus

As we have examined the genomes of various  dog species, one problem has become evident:   The genus Canis is paraphyletic. Two endemic African jackals, the side-striped and black-backed jackal, are actually more distantly related to the wolf-like canids than the African wild dog and dhole are.

One way to solve this problem would be to make the dhole and African wild dog part of Canis, but the problem with this classification remedy is that the paleontology on the dhole and African wild dog is quite hard to trace and still fairly controversial. Anything in their lineage needs to have different classification in order to keep those specimens distinct from the main wolf-like canid clade.

The other solution is to give the black-backed and side-striped jackals their own genus.  In the early part of the twentieth century, it was common to refer to these species within a genus called Lupullela. I’ve noticed that a few papers have popped up using this genus, like this one that examines which predatory species may have left the remains of quarry in a Late Pleistocene cave in Morocco.

I don’t think it will be very long before both the side-striped and black-backed jackal will be commonly referred to as Lupullela.

I won’t be complaining. Paraphyly is something I find annoying.  We are classifying nature in light of evolution, and making sure we have true clades in which animals are classified according to their common descent is important.

The classification of jackals is undergoing a sea change. The creature known as the golden jackal is two species, but the exact way to classify the two species is still hotly contested.  The African “golden jackal” is closer to the wolf and coyote than the Eurasian “golden jackal,” but we don’t have good full-genome data to place the African golden jackal properly. It could wind up that the African golden jackal is very close to the wolf, as the coyote was recently found to be, and this will make the actual classification really touchy.

But that current debate is nothing compared to the way we are starting to classify the two divergent jackals of Africa. These animals don’t get studied as much, but I would highly suspect that there are surprises hidden in their genomes. It could be that there are actually several species currently classified as black-backed and side-striped jackals, and it is also highly likely that there are hybrids among these forms as well as between the species classified currently as side-striped and black-backed jackals.

Neither jackal is endangered, but they are something different, something that is at least worthy of study.

These are sort of forgotten dogs, and their secrets are only now just coming to light.

 


Natural History

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Some Information Regarding the Kerry Blue Terrier Pet Dog


The Blue Kerry terrier pet dog is one of the most mysterious breeds of terriers. This is because of the fact that even though the breed has been known by the Irish for at leas 150 years, nobody really knows where they came from or how they were first bred.

Various legends are told in order to explain the appearance of the Kerry blue terrier breed. Some say that the peasants bred them for hunting purposes since noblemen monopolized the use of wolfhounds. Thus, noblemen hunted with their wolfhounds while peasants poached with their Kerries.

Another legend speaks of a wrecked Russian ship that contained a blue dog. This dog swam into Irish shores and there, mated with the local terrier population. This, of course, started the genetic pool of blue Kerry terriers.

Whatever the case, the blue Kerry terrier sure has a colorful history. It started as a working dog, helping hunters bring in prey. It would also be trained as a police dog by the English. Today, it is considered to be one of the best breeds of dogs that one can own. This is in part of its excellent abilities as a watchdog.

One thing that is so cool about owning a Blue Kerry terrier pet dog is the fact that this breed is adaptable to every situation. It can be a hardworking hunter’s dog. It can become the vigilant watchdog. If you want companionship, it can also provide that. People who are fortunate to have a Blue Kerry terrier pet dog even say that once you are a Kerry lover, you are forever a Kerry lover.

There are some terrier characteristics which may cause a bit of trouble for your dog. Like all terriers, the Blue Kerry terrier pet dog can get into fights with other dogs. In order to prevent this, you need to make sure that the Blue Kerry terrier pet dog is properly socialized. Usually this is done by the breeder.

Most people, when they are getting a pet often ask the question of whether or not a pet can be housebroken easily. Thankfully enough, the Blue Kerry terrier pet dog has a disposition that is easily house trained. The Blue Kerry terrier pet dog is actually quite eager to learn. This means that you will be able to train it very quickly.

Although a Blue Kerry terrier can become an excellent playmate for children, it must be taken that the children do not show any cruelty to the dog.

The Blue Kerry terrier is also one of the more hardy types of terriers. This is because the Blue Kerry terrier has very few genetic problems. Before buying one, however, you need to ask for eye certifications and hip x-rays. These are the most commonly afflicted parts of the Blue Kerry terrier.

A Blue Kerry terrier is not really for everyone. Some people may find it a bit too playful. Some people may not really get used to the Blue Kerry terrier’s curiosity. People may not really understand its habit of following everyone around. Today, the fate of the Blue Kerry terrier dog lies in the hands of the breeders who care for them, nurture them, and make sure that they have great homes to stay in.
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