Would this work similarly when introducing a cat t…

Would this work similarly when introducing a cat to our dog? We have a coonhound mix (about 70 lbs) that we have had for 5 years. We adopted him when he was about one year old, so we don't know what the first year of his life was like. He is very interested in cats when we see them on walks. He first stops and stares at them, then starts baying. We would love to adopt a kitty, but don't know how to do it safely. He has never been in a crate. He is usually a very calm, well behaved dog and we just have never had the need for one. If the cat is the one being introduced to the family, which one would you crate? Any advice you have for us would be MUCH appreciated! Thank you!
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2chを見て

私は、はっきり言ってインターネットには強くありません。
もちろんパソコンは使えますが、最近はやっているインターネットスラングですとか、SNSですとか、そういったものについてはとても疎いという自覚があります。
そんな私でも知っているのが大型掲示板サイトの2ch。
日本で一番、もしかすると世界で一番規模が大きいかもしれない掲示板サイトです。
2chは多くの人の意見や口コミで成り立っているので、色々な物事に対するありのままのコメントを見ることができます。
2chに書かれているのは個人の意見や口コミですから、すべてを鵜呑みにしてしまうわけにもいきません。
ですが、ある程度リアルな声を聞くことができるので、美容整形のように主観による部分が大きい事柄に関してはむしろ使いやすいのではないかと感じたのです。
そうは言っても、2chを開くとその掲示板の多さにめまいがしそうになりますね。
美容整形に関係する掲示板の数もやはり大変多く、目的の掲示板を探すにも苦労してしまいました。

私が美容整形を考えているのは品川美容外科ですから、ぜひ品川美容外科に関する口コミが読みたかったのです。
おすすめの医師のことなどが書いてある掲示板は参考になるので助かりますね。
いくつかの掲示板を見て、まずはプチ整形でおさまるほうれい線や額などのしわ取りから始めることにしました。
それから品川美容外科に電話をしてカウンセリングの予約を取ったのですが、電話の対応がいいですね。
とても丁寧で、気持ちのいい対応をしていただけました。
電話対応のスタッフさんは話し方がやわらかいのにはっきりと聞き取りやすくて、なんだか安心感のある印象でしたよ。
少なくとも、私の品川美容外科に対する第一印象はとてもよくなりました。
受付の女性にもしっかりと指導が行き届いているということは、それだけ組織全体に余裕があるということ。
そういう組織のほうが全体的なレベルも高い傾向にあると思うので、個人的には信用度が高くなりました。

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I will never learn to live in God

no god

I don’t believe in the supernatural.  The natural is fantastical enough without needing some anthropomorphic figure that controls all forces of nature and also justice.  The more I see of humanity and nature, the less I believe that such a figure is likely, and such a figure could not be contained in the ancient edicts of scripture and clergy. It is not that I am rebellious or angry. It’s that I can no longer be illusioned.

To not believe and live in Norway is a lot different than to be in the same theological position and happen to live in West Virginia.  I no longer do, of course, but when I did live there, I felt that I always had to keep my mouth shut.

I no longer feel so constrained. I am an atheist. I don’t believe in God or the Devil.  I came to this conclusion in my 20s, though by the time I was 16, my own version of Christianity had a deist divinity and the Christ figure was but a metaphor.

I never was “born again,” but when I was younger I pretended that I was. Maybe, it was all like make-believe in the literal sense of the two words. Maybe if I just made myself believe it would all work out.

I knew things were going to be strange when I was the only student in my tenth grade biology class who believed that humans resulted from evolution. Most of my classmates either believed in creationism, but the more enlightened ones had some belief that all other organisms evolved. Humans did not. Humans were still a special creation of God.

Christianity and I were never good fits. I remember getting in trouble for praising God for my new pet duck when the pastor asked for praises at the beginning of worship service. I was told that this was not something one praised, but when you’re in the first grade and crazy about animals, there couldn’t be anything to be happier about, right?

My parents were uncomfortable with me leaving my dinosaur figurines behind the rear glass of their car.  They were okay with evolution. We even went to a church that was okay with evolution in terms of doctrine, but lots of people who went to that church were not okay with it.  Some of them may have doubted whether dinosaurs existed at all  and would think that my parents were doing me a great disservice.

I tried really hard to be a Christian and remain curious and skeptical about the world. I found that I could not reconcile the things I found out about nature with the cosmos as described in the Bible.

Further, I came to resent Christians’ hateful obsession with homosexuality. Though I am hetero and cis, I realize that both these things are not of my own choosing. I don’t remember when I chose to be into girls or why I am okay with being stinky old man. I had an epiphany in the eight grade that whatever God I worshiped could not damn people for their sexuality. That would be like damning someone for the color of their skin.

I spent my adolescence trying to reconcile my values and knowledge with Christianity. I wound up discarding lots of Christian doctrine. And then I realized that I should discard the whole thing.

Finding values based in secular morality has not been tough for me. However, realizing that others could not see that their own morality was ultimately secular– they wouldn’t kill  or rape someone because God told them to– was one of the hardest things to deal with.

At one point in my life I was active in the Democratic Party. As an undergraduate I campaigned hard for John Kerry. I had been told that West Virginia was in play, and that I should be doing all I could to get people to vote Democrat.

It turned out that West Virginia had undergone a political sea change in the years in which I was maturing into a young activist. For most of my childhood, no one would admit to being a Republican for fear that you’d be cast in league with Herbert Hoover, the great villain of the 1930s.  But in those years in which I was becoming an adult, the state shifted hard to the right. Fundamentalist Christianity and a dying coal industry were working hard among the rural populace.

I attended college with many kids who were first generation college students. I was aghast at the Iraq War, and many of them were too.

However, when I asked them to vote Democrat, they would say something like “Bush is a Christian.”  I got that answer so often that I wondered if there would ever be any hope for humanity if people could use that religious identification as a justification for political choices.

I was growing more and more skeptical about the world.  And I realized at one point that I needed to let it go.

And I was a quiet atheist for several years, but one day, while perusing the new Youtube on my laptop, I came across Kent Hovind’s lecture “Dinosaurs and the Bible.” The man was an obvious huckster, a true flimflam man from the days patent medicine, who also sold his own patent medicine in the form of laetrile, a supposed cancer cure that is actually the cyanide in the seeds of fruit-bearing plants.

When I finished watching that monstrosity, I was certain that I could never be brought into believing again. I would have to hide my atheism, but at some point, I did become more public with it.

I am not ashamed that I don’t believe in God and that I never will again. As time marches on, my nation is becoming more and more secular, just like the other formerly majority protestant countries in Europe.  It has just taken the US a lot longer.

The fact that so much of Christianity is now tied up in the worship of Trump pretty much means the eventual downfall of the institution in the United States. His are the politics of the old and angry, stilling holding onto a world that will never exist again.

I will never learn to live in God. I will instead learn to live with the reality that my time is finite. In that finite existence, I must be who I want to be and nothing else. If this is offensive, then you stand to be offended. But I will not hide what I am and what I seek to be.

Someday, I will cease to exist. The same goes for the oak tree that grows tall on a distant ridge. Its acorns feed the deer, the squirrels, the turkeys, and bears. It will live through many generations of its beneficiaries then on some windy day in March, the great wooden edifice will come crashing down. It will decompose into the leaf litter, restoring its elements to the soil from whence it came.

I am no more significant in the grand scheme than an oak or the squirrels that bury its acorns. We are all biotic beings, produced through the great story of evolution.

Who could need anything else? Why invoke some supernatural thing, when the natural explanation is so wondrous and so complete?

And that’s where I fall on that great question. I wager this, because I cannot live in the unlikely wager that the Bible is correct, when it is wrong about so many fundamental things. Not just wrong about biology or cosmology but wrong about moral questions too. Slavery is not condemned in the Bible nor is genocide. Indeed, both are commanded at  various books.

So this is where I stand. A heathen but an intellectually honest one.

 

 

 

Natural History

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10 Simple Summertime Recipes

10 Simple Summertime Recipes

Technically we have three weeks until summer starts, but since Memorial Day is considered the unofficial start, and the pool is now open here and the kids are out of school and the sun has been (sort of sometimes) shining in Chicagoland, I’m going to just go with it and say summer has arrived.

This is my favorite time of year for many reasons, but summertime food is a big part of it. Today I thought I’d put together a roundup of a few of the recipes I’ve shared here in the past that are, at least in my mind, perfect for the summer months. Just click on the images or links below them to check them out.

Summertime Watermelon and Feta Guacamole Dip
Jasmine Rice, Lentil, and Red Quinoa Tacos
Sweet Corn and Black Bean Quinoa Salad
Red, White, and Blue Sweet Salsa + Chips
Cheddar + Swiss, Fuji Apple, and Avocado Sandwich
Guacamole and Black Bean Pizza (via Bubby and Bean)

What is your favorite summertime food?

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Bubby and Bean ::: Living Creatively

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死亡事故への疑問

最近、美容外科での死亡事故のニュースを目にすることが多くなったように感じます。
病院の医療ミスで患者が死亡というニュースは一時期良く耳にしたものですし、心臓や脳などの大切な臓器に直接手術をするのですから、小さなミスが死亡につながるということは納得でき、同時にどこか仕方がないもののように感じていました。
ですが、美容外科では体の奥深くにまでメスを入れるわけでもなし、死亡事故なんて起こるものなのかしら?と不思議だったのです。

私自身、そろそろ顔のたるみやしわが気になってくる年頃です。
具体的な年齢は伏せさせていただきますが、いわゆるアラサーを通り越してアラフォーに至ろうとしている頃とだけ言わせていただきます。
世間的にはまだ若い方とはいえ、それでも年々衰えていくことに変わりはなく、このたびついにプチ整形を決意した次第です。
そこで色々なことを調べていたのですが、こういった悪いうわさが出てくるということはそれだけ美容整形を受けた人が多いということに他なりません。
死亡というあまりいいイメージのない言葉と、「美容整形 よかった」といういい言葉で調べてみたところ、後者の方が検索結果がはるかに多いということもわかりました。
分母が大きければ問題もそれだけ大きくなる、ということのようです。
ならば特に気にすることもないものと判断し、美容整形に踏み切ることにしました。

数ある美容整形外科の中でもどこがいいのか、まったくの初体験である私にはわかりません。
じっくりと検討した結果、術前の説明が丁寧でアフターケアがあり、さらに手術ごとに保証期間のある品川美容外科を選びカウンセリングを予約しました。
私は石橋を叩いて渡る主義ですので、これから受けようとしている美容整形手術について今後も調べられるだけ調べようと思っています。
そして、その結果を私のように美容整形について悩んでいる人と共有することができればと思いこのブログを立ち上げました。
整形のことで悩んでいる人の手助けができれば幸いです。

FunnyDogsVideos.com

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A Fun End-of-School-Year Interview for Kids

A Fun End-of-School-Year Interview for Kids
A Fun Start of School Year Interview For Kids

For the last couple of years, I’ve been using a list of questions I put together for my now 5 year-old-daughter to ask her on the first and last day of school. When I initially shared it here, it received a lot of traffic and was pinned quite a bit on Pinterest, so I’ve shared it every first and last day since.

Some of my daughter’s responses on this school year’s first day were the same as her last day (which was last week; kindergarten here we come!), and some changed quite a bit. It’s endearing and bittersweet to see her growth just through her answers to the questions. 

(I’m putting her previous answers from the first day of this school year in italics.)

1. What is your name? Essley. Essley.
2. What grade are you in? I just graduated from Pre-K! Pre-K.
3. How old are you? 5. 4-1/2.
4. What is your favorite color? Pink and purple. Pink.
5. What is your favorite thing to do at school? Play in the kitchen. Play with my friends. And learn how to not be bad. (No comment on that one.)
6. What is your favorite activity outside of school?
Acting, ballet, jazz, tap, soccer, and swimming.  Tap, ballet, gymnastics, soccer, theatre, and swimming lessons.  
7. What do you want to be when you grow up? A dance teacher, a horticulturist, and an acting teacher. A dance teacher and an artist.
8. What is your favorite food? Tacos. Strawberries.
9. How old is your mommy? 24. (I wish!) Old.
10. What is her job? Blog poster. She works a lot on blog posts.
11. What is mommy’s favorite food? Tacos. Indian food and a lot of smoothies.
12. How old is your daddy? 58 (hahahahhahaha!). Old. I think 20.
13. What is his job? Stage Manager. Stage Manager.
14. What is daddy’s favorite food? Tacos. Kabobs. He likes cheeseburgers.
15. What do mommy and daddy like to do? Play with us. Work. (Yikes.)
16. If you have brothers or sisters, what are their names? A baby brother and his name is Emmett. Emmett. Sometimes I call him Crispy.
17. How old is your brother(s) (and/or sisters)? 3. 2.
18. What is your brother(s) (and/or sisters) favorite food? Tacos. Mac and cheese. Also olives.
19. What is your favorite toy? Rosie and Owly. Rosie (doll) and Owly (her favorite owl toy since she was a baby).
20. Where do you live? Chicago area. Somewhere by Chicago.
21. What is your favorite thing to do? Play. Play with my mommy.  
22. What is your favorite place you’ve ever been? The Fun Play Place. The candy store.
23. Who is your best friend? Emmett. Mommy and ….. (an endless lists of friends; too many to type.)
24. What is your favorite animal? Elephant. Tiger.
25. If you could have anything you wished for, what would it be? A unicorn. A bunny for a pet.

And because my little man is finally old enough to answer the questions as well, I’m sharing his. He has grown tremendously this year, and was so excited to answer my questions like his big sissy. (He was nowhere near ready to do the interview on his first day, and was also terrified of school. He went from weeping at drop off to only being sad on the days he didn’t have school. So proud of this guy!)

A Fun End-of-School-Year Interview for Kids


1. What is your name? Emmett
2. What grade are you in? Preschool.
3. How old are you? 3
4. What is your favorite color? Blue.
5. What is your favorite thing to do at school? Play.
6. What is your favorite activity outside of school? Sports class.
7. What do you want to be when you grow up? A dinosaur and a farmer.
8. What is your favorite food? Mac and cheese.
9. How old is your mommy? 11.
10. What is her job? Kiss.
11. What is mommy’s favorite food? Mac and cheese.
12. How old is your daddy? 48.
13. What is his job? Kiss.
14. What is daddy’s favorite food? Mac and cheese.
15. What do mommy and daddy like to do? Play.
16. If you have brothers or sisters, what are their names? Essley.
17. How old is your brother(s) (and/or sisters)? 4 (she’s actually 5).
18. What is your brother(s) (and/or sisters) favorite food? Tacos.
19. What is your favorite toy? Grover.
20. Where do you live? Chicago.
21. What is your favorite thing to do? Run.
22. What is your favorite place you’ve ever been? The Fun Play Place.
23. Who is your best friend? Tucker and Millie and Olivia.
24. What is your favorite animal? Pig.
25. If you could have anything you wished for, what would it be? Go to Mully’s house.

If any of you use these question to interview your preschoolers or grade schoolers, I’d love to hear some of their replies! Oh, and we purchased the chalkboard signs we used for our photos from this awesome Etsy shop.

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Bubby and Bean ::: Living Creatively

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Carrier Bag

In the bag!
RIVIERA DOGS

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Donna, thanks so much for addressing this paralle…

Donna, thanks so much for addressing this parallel. When my own girl, Daisy, joined me in 2001, it became devastatingly clear that the model of thought that engenders pit bull-type prejudice is inevitably linked to human ethnicity prejudice. When Daisy joined me, I had no idea that "pit bulls" were a thing. Except that my girl was one, I had no idea that dog breeds could be a target of prejudice. My girl taught me to always greet hatred with love and compassion, even joy. It came to be that while we stood shoulder to shoulder, we were standing for not only ourselves, but for all sentient beings. Tolerance and kindness is non-negotiable, and while it may never become the baseline, I hope that by working together, it may at least become socially formative across ALL demo graphics.
BAD RAP Blog

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Ecosystems are Not Timeless

woodland caribou

I had the pleasure of listening to Diane Boyd, a noted wolf expert, talk about wolf conservation issues on Steven Rinella’s Meatear Podcast. It is very good info about wolves, including wolf conspiracy theories.  One part I found particularly interesting was about the history of Isle Royale, which is experiencing a wolf reintroduction this year. Isle Royale is, of course, home to one of the longest running ecological studies that has examined predator and prey relationships.  The study mainly focuses on moose and wolves on the island, but an inbreeding depression reduced the wolf population of the island to two individuals last year.

I have always thought of Isle Royale as being a place of wolves and moose. But wolves came to the island only in the 1949, and moose came only in the early 1900s.

In the podcast with Diane Boyd, she mentions that Isle Royale was originally known for its woodland caribou and Canada lynx.  Boyd speculated that moose introduced brainworm to the caribou, but a more likely reason for their disappearance is that woodland caribou are sensitive to human-centered activities. All the logging and mining that happened on Isle Royale could not have done the caribou many favors. The last caribou was documented on the island in 1925.

Canada lynx are not particularly good predators of caribou. They were likely living on snowshoe hares, which are found on the island. Maybe, when snowshoe hares experienced the crash portion of their boom or bust population cycle, the lynx occasionally turned to hunting caribou, as they did in Newfoundland.

If Isle Royale’s fauna had remained the same at the beginning of the twentieth century as it did at the beginning, maybe it never would have become such a great place to study predator and prey population dynamics.

The restoration of wolves to Isle Royale, which is happening as I write this piece, is an attempt to bring back an ecology that dates all the way back to 1949. I have readers who can remember 1949.

We have this idea that conservation is about restoring things to an Eden when things were unmolested, untrammeled, and pure.  But what seems to be timeless is ultimately just temporary.

Last night, I was grappling with the concepts of conservation, specifically the idea of rewilding.  Rewilding is about restoring organisms to the land that were there at some point. Some think of feral horses in the West as being rewilded, from the Pleistocene though I am greatly skeptical of this idea.

Of late, though, there have been proposal to restore Pleistocene fauna to their former ranges, and if that animal can’t be found exactly, then a facsimile will be brought in.

In the case of North America, African elephants have been proposed as being equivalent of the Columbian and woolly mammoths. African lions might take the place of old Panthera atrox.   Some have even suggested that the plains of Texas, which are filling with blackbuck, might be a great place to turn out some cheetahs, thinking of course that Old World cheetahs are somehow the equivalent the long-legged coursing cougars that once roamed the Pleistocene wild of North America.

We don’t really know what killed off all these fantastic beasts of the Pleistocene. I lean more toward rapid warming at the time of the Pleistocene/Holocene boundary, but many reasonable people find some merit in Paul Martin’s “Overkill Hypothesis.”  This hypothesis contents that the Siberian hunter-gatherers who came into North America wound up killing off much of the megabeasts, or lacking such evidence of profligate killing, contend that these hunter-gatherers killed off a few keystone species, such as mammoths and mastodons, to cause ecosystems to collapse.

If this hypothesis is correct, there is a moral force for this Pleistocene rewilding concept. Humanity is responsible for killing off the megabeasts, and it is our duty to restore North America to its former glory as the land with the great bison, pachyderms, camels, and equines.

But this takes me back to Isle Royale. Humans certainly disrupted that ecosystem. If we wished to restore Isle Royale to its form ecosystem, we should be shooting off all the moose on the island and turning out woodland caribou from Ontario. We shouldn’t be trapping wolves and turning them loose. We should be trapping Canada lynx instead.

Canada lynx are much rarer in the Upper Midwest than gray wolves are, so by a triage of the conservation needs of the species, it would make more sense to preserve Isle Royale for the lynx.

Of course, that’s not what is being done. The wolf and moose studies are too deeply ingrained in our science and our understanding these two species. And if you were to twist my arm, I’d say choose wolves and moose over caribou and lynx.

But this is logic of Pleistocene rewilding. It is to say that we can somehow turn back the clock on that happened long before North America had cities and agriculture and way long before the continent was divided into nation-states.

Indeed, while we’re theorizing about Pleistocene rewilding, we’re not really coming to terms with that fact that Pre-Columbian rewilding is a project that will only go so far. Yes, we’ll have wolves come back to the Upper Midwest and the Western States.

But no one is seriously considering restoring grizzly bears to Texas or even attempt to bring back wolverines to Michigan.

We cannot handle that idea of wildlife now. That we have managed to hold onto so many wild places and restore so many wildlife species is a certain greatness about the United States. However, this feature is one that always exists in tension, one that must be recognized and fully understood.

Isle Royal in 2019 is not the same as Isle Royal in 1960, which was not the same as Isle Royale when the loggers and the miners came.

And if that one island is so different, imagine how different the entire continent of North America has become since the Pleistocene gave way to the Holocene, which has now giving away to the Anthropocene.

There is a sadness in knowing that things pass, and we certainly have a moral duty to prevent extinction and to preserve what ecosystems we can.

But we should understand that what we’re preserving was never timeless, and even in our attempts at restoration, we aren’t always going back to the known original condition of a place. We often go back to what seemed wondrous and pure and wild.

And if we can understand this simple fact, maybe we can get a handle on what our species continues to do to the planet and the rest of life that resides here with us. We have done much, but we shouldn’t assume that we are preserving any kind of stasis.

I write these words from the northern edge of Appalachian Ohio, awaiting the arrival of the nine-banded armadillo, which will some day come working its way up from North Carolina and Tennessee into Virginia and then West Virginia.  Xenarthan,  the “strange jointed stranger”  with roots in Latin America, it will come scurrying along into this part of the world.

What it may change in our ecosystems, I cannot guess. But it is coming.  When it arrives, it will roam where wolves once howled and elk bulls bugled.

And its story on the land will be one to note. It will not be timeless. It will a temporal as the fleetingness of existence, a bit of the faunal guild of the Anthropocene making a name for itself in a new land, just as those Siberian hunters did all those thousands of years ago.

 

Natural History

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I’m Badder

I fought you for 4,000 miles. And the fight has only begun. #companionsagainstcancer
2 Dogs 2000 Miles

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